Home Boat Shop New Boats Launched: Islander 34

Launched: Islander 34

Islander34The Spanish boatbuilder previously known as Menorquin — now Minorca Yachts — is back in the Americas with a new boat and a new distributor. The Islander 34 debuted at the Palm Beach International Boat Show in March with distributor SYS Yacht Sales of Jupiter, Florida. Built in the Balearic Islands by the Sasga yard, these unique semidisplacement motoryachts were briefly sold in the United States about 15 years ago.

The Islander 34 is the launch model for the Americas. It’s a salty-looking boat with a steep plumb bow, accentuated bow flare and a rounded stern. The lines and contemporary design cues are a bit easier on the eyes than some of the builder’s past models, which drew heavily from traditional Spanish fishing vessels. “The new boats are completely different in each and every way, though they maintain the flavor of the brand,” says designer Iñigo Toledo. “Everything you see and many of the parts you don’t see are new.”

SPECIFICATIONS

LOA: 34 feet

BEAM: 12 feet, 6 inches

WEIGHT: 17,000 pounds

DRAFT: 3 feet, 7 inches

HULL TYPE: semidisplacement

POWER: twin 220-hp Yanmar diesels

SPEED: 22.7 knots top, 16-17 knots cruise

TANKAGE: 172 gallons fuel, 92 gallons water, 60 gallons waste

PRICE: $304,643

CONTACT: SYS Yacht Sales, Jupiter, Florida, (561) 300-7406. minorcayachts.com

A pair of Yanmar 6BY3 turbo diesels powers the Islander 34. Top speed is 22.7 knots, though most owners will cruise at around 16 knots. This is where the engines burn around 12 gallons per hour, offering up a theoretical cruising range of about 229 miles with the 172-gallon fuel tank. The boat rides an efficient but stout semidisplacement hull built using a resin-infusion process.

There’s a two-cabin layout below, highlighted by teak joinery and contrasting white upholstery and interior components. The master stateroom is in the bow, with a large island berth and plenty of stowage cabinetry for a cruising couple. A full-beam guest cabin sits athwartships under the pilothouse with two single berths. An enclosed head/shower is to port, shared by both staterooms. The roomy main saloon features a large dinette, a port-side lounge and a small galley across from the starboard helm.

“Yes, it’s all about increasing the volume,” Toledo says. “Everything is bigger, including the stateroom, the guest cabin and the main saloon.”

This article originally appeared in the June 2017 issue.

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