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News Focused on Activity in our Coastal Waters

Ethanol complicates winter storage

Experts recommend a fuel stabilizer and other treatments for protection from the additive's effects

The ethanol in gasoline can cause a number of engine and fuel system problems.When you put your boat to bed for the winter, remember that proper preparation of the fuel system and engine is crucial because of the damage ethanol-blended gasoline can cause. The ethanol in gasoline has caused older fiberglass fuel tanks to deteriorate, fuel lines to gum up, and pistons and valves to fail.

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E15 approval means boaters should beware

Paying close attention to pump labels will be important to avoid filling up with the higher ethanol blend

ValvTect says it won't sell E15 at any of the 600 marinas that carry its fuel, which is formulated to prevent ethanol problems.Now that the federal government has approved the sale of gasoline with up to 15 percent ethanol, boat owners will have to check fuel-pump labels carefully to be sure the gas they use contains no more than 10 percent ethanol.

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Boat fire destroys 30-year adventure

A sailboat fire Saturday afternoon at Donaldson's Point in Parker, Fla., choked the area in smoke and saddened a neighborhood.

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Capt. Calamity is again boatless

Brit who surfs on a catamaran is 'rescued' for the ninth time at $4,000 a pop after capsizing

Glenn Crawley thinks of himself as a skilled sailor who likes to 'take a few risks, have a little adventure.'Glenn Crawley wants to set the record straight after trashing his second catamaran in the last four years - flipping for the 13th time overall - in angry surf off Newquay's beaches in Cornwall, England, where rescuers have taken to calling him "Capt. Calamity."

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Dispatches

HEAVY LOAD:  The Columbia River Bar Pilots' 44-year-old boat Peacock, which was built in Germany and worked the mouth of the river from 1967 to 1999, is now on permanent display outside the Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria, Ore. Lifting the 80-ton 90-foot steel vessel required two cranes with a combined lifting capacity of more than 800 tons. The Peacock's final berth is 100 feet from the river's edge, beside Highway 30, the busiest route into Astoria.

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