Activists decry record-setting mako shark catch

Author:
Updated:
Original:

News that a sport fisherman reeled in and kept a potentially record-setting mako shark off the Southern California coast is making waves with conservationists, who berated the catch because shark populations are vulnerable to overfishing worldwide.

The female shark, caught Monday off Huntington Beach, weighed about 1,323 pounds, the Associated Press reported. It was 11 feet long and had an 8-foot girth, said Kent Williams, a California-certified fish weight master and the owner of New Fishall Bait, where the shark was taken for frozen storage.

Jason Johnston, of Mesquite, Texas, caught the shark after a 2-1/2-hour battle, the Orange County Register reported.

If the catch is confirmed and meets conditions, it would exceed the 1,221-pound record mako catch made in July 2001 off the coast of Chatham, Mass., Jack Vitek, world records coordinator for the Florida-based International Game Fish Association, told the Los Angeles Times. It takes about two months for the association to verify domestic catches, he said.

Williams, who is storing the massive creature, told the AP that the meat normally would be donated to a local homeless shelter. Plans call for this one to be donated for research.

Under state law, anglers can take two such sharks per outing, but such large catches are exceedingly rare, Williams said. That’s mostly because even if an angler hooks such a large fish, very few are able to land it, Williams told the AP.

“There’s very few of these caught each year, but every time one’s caught, people make a big deal about it,” he said.

On Wednesday, angry callers from as far away as Australia were phoning Williams’ wholesale fish bait business to complain that he was storing the shark there.

Click here for the AP report and video.