Beneteau’s new Flyer 12 cruiser - Soundings Online

Beneteau’s new Flyer 12 cruiser

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French boatbuilder Beneteau has introduced an enclosed hardtop express cruiser that joins its Antares line of flybridge cruisers and the Swift-Trawler 42, which was introduced in 2004 and now is built at Beneteau USA’s facility in Marion, S.C.

French boatbuilder Beneteau has introduced an enclosed hardtop express cruiser that joins its Antares line of flybridge cruisers and the Swift-Trawler 42, which was introduced in 2004 and now is built at Beneteau USA’s facility in Marion, S.C.

The 41-foot Flyer 12 represents somewhat of a departure for Beneteau powerboats in terms of styling, propulsion and performance. It has a curved windshield and a molded hardtop with an electric sunroof, and the sheer line sweeps down at the cockpit to meet the large, integrated swim platform. The 36-mph boat rides a new modified-vee hull, and Beneteau designers worked with Volvo Penta to integrate that company’s Inboard Performance System.

“It is definitely entering new territory for us,” says Wayne Burdick, president of Beneteau USA. “If it doesn’t look like it belongs alongside a Ferrari or a Porsche, I don’t know what does. And it drives like one, too.”

Burdick has high praise for Volvo Penta’s IPS. The IPS 400 on the Flyer comprises a pair of 310-hp D6 diesels connected to outdrives mounted through the hull bottom. Forward-facing propellers are mounted on the forward end of the drives.

“It’s a remarkably controllable boat,” he says. “One of the amazing things is that backing down, it literally backs down like a car.” He says he has found that even if one engine is shut down, the operator still has good control in forward or reverse. Shaft drives also are available, he says.

With a pair of aluminum fuel tanks and total capacity of 317 gallons, the Flyerhas a reported range of more than 300 miles at 25 mph. The 41-footer also is designed to run comfortably in bad weather, Burdick says.

“All of the Beneteaus are designed, first and foremost, to be used in the Bay of Biscay,” he says in reference to the French bay’s notorious conditions.

Burdick says he has had occasion to jump the waves of a megayacht during sea trials, and found the Flyer quiet and smooth. Noise readings on board yielded 77 decibels at 32 mph.

The layout allows for two cabins and two heads below. The saloon and galley-up are in the enclosed bridge deck area, where there is U-shaped seating with a table to starboard, abaft the helm station and its double bench for two. The galley, to port, has a wooden work surface that can be concealed when not in use, and is equipped with a two-burner stove, built-in microwave with grill, stainless steel double sink, refrigerator, and a bottle and spice rack.

Below, the forward stateroom has a centerline double berth with storage lockers; additional lockers, hanging lockers and storage along the hull ceiling; dressing table with mirror; and an optional flat-screen television. The master head compartment is to port and has an electric marine head and separate stall shower.

The second stateroom, also with double berth, is to port, and the second head is to starboard.

The boat has wide side decks, a stainless steel bow rail and space for an optional sunpad on the foredeck. The estimated $500,000 price includes delivery and such equipment as air conditioning and a generator, according to Burdick.