Foul Is Unfair - Soundings Online

Foul Is Unfair

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This year’s Atlantic hurricane season has been exceptionally active, with an above average 16 named storms, 10 hurricanes and six major hurricanes. Though the season ends Nov. 30, the weather gods don’t always play by the calendar.

If you haven’t hauled out yet, or you live in an area with a year-round boating season, this video has some tips for tying up properly when foul weather is expected:

Soundings columnist Tom Neale and his wife survived a tornado aboard. Its duration obviously was nowhere near a hurricane’s, but that doesn’t diminish the intense situation they lived through. A well-built boat can be the difference when the chips are down.

Read about their ordeal in the November issue of Soundings.

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