Gear test: Mr. Funnel

Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0

As simple as a funnel is, there are those that are ineffective and counter productive and others that are truly beneficial and well-designed. The latter is the case with a product known as Mr. Funnel.

As simple as a funnel is, there are those that are ineffective and counter productive and others that are truly beneficial and well-designed. The latter is the case with a product known as Mr. Funnel.

 

As we all know, dirt and water are virtually unavoidable in stored fuel. The contaminated fuel at the very least can plug filters and in worst cases can seriously damage engines. Mr. Funnel is made from an anti-static polypropylene and incorporates a filter and sump that act together to keep contaminants out of your fuel tank.

When fuel is poured into the funnel, water and debris cannot pass through the fluoropolymer-coated stainless steel filter but instead are collected in the funnel’s sump for disposal. Only filtered fuel is allowed to pass through and into the tank. To comply with marine requirements that all parts of the fuel system be grounded, the black Mr. Funnel has carbon powder injected into the plastic along with the other raw materials, allowing it to conduct the static electricity generated during the refueling process.

To test its effectiveness, I mixed a pint of water with a quart of fuel, then sprinkled in a small handful of dirt from the garden. It was easy to see the water building up in the sump, with dirt swirling around as well. As soon as fuel stopped flowing from the funnel opening, I tilted Mr. Funnel to one side, exposing the sump filled with water and dirt. The filtered fuel in the container below was dirt-free and without signs of water. Since the filter material is coated with Teflon, the dirt doesn’t stick to it, allowing easy cleaning of the sump.

There are four Mr. Funnel models to choose from, based on dimensions and fuel flow requirements. The F1 measures 3.5 inches in diameter, 6 inches tall and has a flow rate of 2.7 gallons per minute, while the F3 measures 8.75 inches in diameter, 5.5 inches tall and has a flow rate of 5.5 gpm. These are recommended for transferring 5 gallons or less. For larger transfers, the F8 measures 10 inches in diameter, 8.5 inches tall and has a flow rate of 5 gpm, while the largest F15 has the same dimensions but a flow rate of 15 gpm. Mr. Funnel also offers a flexible extension that slips over the funnel spout and increases reach by about 8 inches.

Using the funnel will slow the fill rate when pumping fuel, so if you are taking on a large quantity, the company suggests pumping the first 5 or 10 gallons and inspecting the funnel. If no water or contaminants are present, pump directly into the tank and retest about halfway through the filling process. The company also recommends periodic testing by pouring water into filter (one cup for the F3, two for the F8 and F15). If no water passes through, the filter screen is doing its job.

Mr. Funnel is available through numerous online retailers, which are listed at www.mrfunnel.com . They also are available at West Marine under the West Marine brand. I found street prices as low as $12.50 for the F1, while the F15 comes in at $49.95. They are fairly priced and work well enough to consider owning several different sizes, for your containers at home, as well as on board.