VIDEO: Eighteenth-Century Mansion Takes Boat Ride

A 255-year-old historic Maryland mansion last week made a 50-mile barge journey on Chesapeake Bay to its new home on the Wye River.
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Besides needing a lot of TLC, the Neely family found only one other problem with purchasing the 255-year-old Galloway Mansion in Easton, Maryland: It was not situated on the water.

That may seem like a real estate deal-breaker, but after many months of planning and coordination, the 400-ton structure last week was moved from its historic Easton foundation and floated 50 miles on a barge to its new foundation on Wye River, where the family will restore the historic structure to live in.

This video shows an aerial view of the waterborne maneuver:

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