Keeping Boatbuilding Traditions Alive

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Wooden boatbuilding history would be lost if it weren’t for enthusiasts who continue to build boats the traditional way.

John England, the chief of volunteers at the Deltaville Maritime Museum in Deltaville, Virginia, is one of them, and the Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star wrote a story about his dedication to preserving Chesapeake Bay watercraft.

England was also in charge of the five-year reconstruction of a log-built, Poquoson-style buyboat named F.D. Crockett, and you can read about that in this 2016 Soundings story.

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