NOAA satellites aid in the rescue of 295 people

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In 2010, NOAA satellites were critical in the rescues of 295 people from life-threatening situations throughout the United States and its surrounding waters. The satellites picked up distress signals from emergency beacons carried by downed pilots, shipwrecked boaters and stranded hikers, and relayed the information about their location to first responders on the ground.

NOAA's polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites, along with Russia's COSPAS spacecraft, are part of the international Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking system, called COSPAS-SARSAT. This system uses a network of satellites to quickly detect and locate distress signals from emergency beacons on board aircraft and boats, and from smaller, handheld personal locator beacons.

Alaska had the most people rescued last year with 77, followed by Florida with 37, and West Virginia with 17 who were aboard a downed Army Reserve helicopter.

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