Small Stuff September 2007 New England

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Moratorium placed on sailing schools

As part of an enhanced focus on quality control, the American Sailing Association will no longer accept applications for new sailing schools after Sept. 15.

For the first time in its 24-year history, ASA is enacting a moratorium on accepting applications for new sailing schools within the United States for at least one year. The moratorium is part of an effort to continue to improve quality at the 270 professionally accredited sailing schools currently affiliated with ASA worldwide.

ASA will continue to certify instructors and students at schools affiliated with ASA.

“We take seriously our mission to continue to improve quality control among our existing schools,” says ASA executive director Charlie Nobles.

ASA’s new online certification system will provide a component of ASA’s new quality control efforts. The system streamlines the process for instructors to gain certifications for their students. Instead of submitting multiple pages of time-consuming paperwork by mail or fax, ASA’s new online system allows instructors to file qualifying paperwork online.

The new system forms the cornerstone of the new quality control system by allowing ASA to e-mail every graduating sailing student a comprehensive customer survey questionnaire. Once completed, the forms are e-mailed back to ASA, allowing staff to identify in real time any practices that do not conform to the organization’s rigorous standards.

ASA has established a strategic partnership with the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, and has also consulted with the U.S. Department of Transportation and the National Parks Service.

One-Design symposium set for November

US Sailing’s One-Design Sailing Symposium will take place in Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 17 and 18. One-design sailors and class and regatta organizers from all corners of the country will head to the Midwest this fall to participate in this annual think tank, a national event designed to keep the one-design sector of the sport healthy and thriving.

Sponsored by Gowrie, Barden & Brett — one of the largest marine insurance agencies in the United States — the symposium will feature seminars, workshops, and forums for all levels of sailors and organizers on a wide range of topics: from the nuts and bolts of running a class to strategies on how to build your fleet and keep class members coming back to the starting line.

Participants will also be able to pick up performance tips at four go-fast workshops being lead by one-design champions throughout the weekend.

The registration fee for the weekend symposium is $120 per person until Nov. 1, and $145 after and US Sailing members receive $25 off. www.ussailing.org/odcc