The Big Chute

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If you take the Trent–Severn Waterway, the 240-mile-long canal route between Lake Ontario and Georgian Bay in Lake Huron, the Big Chute Marine Railway gets your boat from one lake to the other.

The Big Chute, as it is known for short, works on an inclined plane to carry boats in individual cradles over a change of height of about 60 feet. It is the only marine railway or canal inclined plane of its kind in North America still in use, and it is overseen by federally operated Parks Canada.

In this cool little video, narrated by the acting lock master, you learn how boats are carried up and down the unique railway. It’s worth a watch.

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